Seasonal Tips

Watering Guidelines for Summer

During hot summer weather, your lawn needs special care. Please observe the following guidelines to get your lawn through the hot summer months

  • Always water in the morning, between 3:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m
  • Never water in the late afternoon or evening.
  • Always deeply water your lawn. Watering for only 5 to 10 minutes per day can actually harm your turf.
  • Check your sprinklers each week to ensure proper function.
  • Check your lawn for compaction. If you can’t push a screwdriver at least 6 inches into your lawn, or if you have excessive runoff when deeply watering (20 minutes or longer), your lawn is compacted and you’ll need core aeration and wetting agents to correct the problem.
  • Cut your grass ½ to 1 inch higher from May through October.

General Lawn Watering Schedule Guidelines

(May through October)

Standard PVC 3-inch to 4-inch Pop-Ups (Like Toro 570s)
Avg. Temperature Minutes Per Station Times Per Week
75 to 85 Degrees 20 3
85 to 95 Degrees 20 4
95 Degrees 20 Every Day
Standard
Brass-Style Pop-Ups
Avg. Temperature Minutes Per Station Times Per Week
75 to 85 Degrees 30 3
85 to 95 Degrees 30 4
95 Degrees 30 Every Day
Impact Rainbirds or Stream-Style Rotary Sprinklers
Avg. Temperature Minutes Per Station Times Per Week
75 to 85 Degrees 45 3
85 to 95 Degrees 45 4
95 Degrees 45 Every Day

Mowing Your Lawn

By mowing correctly, you’ll be rewarded with a healthier, more beautiful lawn. Here are five easy ways to make the most of your mower:

  • Adjust your mowing height according to the seasons. Mowing short in cooler weather discourages disease. Mowing high in hot weather retains moisture, encourages deeper root growth, and keeps the soil shaded to help prevent weed seeds from germinating.
  • Keep your mower blades sharp. Dull blades lead to brown, shredded grass tips that are unattractive and more susceptible to disease.
  • Alternate your mowing pattern so that your grass won’t bend in one direction.
  • Try to mow regularly and remove no more than ⅓ of the grass blade at a time. “Scalping,” or cutting too short, removes too many of the green, food-producing cells needed for healthy growth.
  • For obvious safety reasons, avoid mowing wet grass. This will also give you a more even cut and the clippings won’t clump up as much

Aeration

Power core aeration is one of the most important cultural practices available for your lawn. Aeration helps control thatch, improves the soil structure, helps create growth pockets for new roots and opens the way for water, air and fertilizer to reach the root zone of your lawn.

Annual aeration is advised for all lawns on heavy clay soils, those with a thatch buildup and any lawn that needs to be “thickened up.” This service removes thousands of small cores of soil from your lawn. The cores “melt” back into your lawn after a few rainfalls, mixing with and helping to break down the thatch layer (more than ½ inch of thatch can be harmful).

The holes created by aeration catch air, fertilizer and water. Turf roots naturally grow toward these growth pockets and thicken in the process. Aeration holes also relieve pressure from compacted soils, letting oxygen and water move more freely into the root zone.

Performed once per year, aeration will significantly improve the looks and health of your turf!

Brown Turf?

There are many different reasons why a lawn can turn brown: not enough water, pet damage, insects, or diseases such as fairy ring, pythium blight and brown patch – just to name a few. If you’re noticing brown spots in your lawn, just give Lawnscape Systems a call. We’ll be happy to provide you with a detailed lawn analysis and recommend the proper course of action.

Grubs

There are several types of white grubs that feed on the roots of lawn grasses. All of them can cause severe damage if left untreated.

Grubs live and feed in the soil. It’s easy to miss grubs as they gradually cut the roots out from under your lawn until brown patches begin to appear and they’re finally discovered. If you suspect grubs, pull back the turf. If the lawn pulls up easily (like new sod), you may find white grubs in the top inch or so of the soil.

Grubs are the larval (or worm) state of many types of beetles. The beetles lay their eggs in your lawn, and the newly hatched worms work their way through the thatch and into the soil, where they feed on the roots of grass plants.

Grubs don’t disappear on their own. They should be treated before damage begins to appear, or as soon as they’re discovered. Give Lawnscape Systems a call for more information and to learn how we can help.

Lawn Fungus Disease

Lawn funguses can destroy your lawn if not addressed properly, and the sooner the better to minimize damage. Here are some signs of lawn fungus diseases, and the best ways to keep them under control.

  • Patches of silver-gray or bleached-white turf
  • A pinkish cast to your lawn
  • Purplish-brown spots with lighter centers on grass blades

Healthy lawns have an easier time standing up to fungus diseases, so regular fertilization, aerating and mowing with a sharp blade are helpful (mowing with a dull blade can shred grass tips, making it easier for fungus spores to enter the plants). It’s also important to water less often and more deeply, since fungus spores spread in water.

If fungus disease does appear, a prompt fungicide treatment can improve your lawn’s chances for recovery and decrease the potential for long-term damage. Please call us right away if you suspect fungus disease in your lawn. If fungus disease does appear, a prompt fungicide treatment can improve your lawn’s chances for recovery and decrease the potential for long-term damage. Please call us right away if you suspect fungus disease in your lawn.